Postgraduate Programs 2017/18
Master of Philosophy and Doctor of Philosophy Programs in Humanities
Award Title

Master of Philosophy in Humanities
Doctor of Philosophy in Humanities

Program Short Name

MPhil(HUMA)
PhD(HUMA)

Mode of Study

Both full- and part-time

Normative Program Duration

MPhil

Full-time: 2 years
Part-time: 4 years
 

PhD

Full-time: 3 years (with a relevant research master’s degree), 4 years (with a bachelor’s degree only)
Part-time: 6 years

Program Advisor

RPg Programs Coordinator:
Prof Carine Y M YIU, Assosiate Professor of Humanities

The Master of Philosophy (MPhil) Program provides training for students who intend to pursue careers in teaching and research. It can be an end in itself or serve as preparation for a PhD degree. Students may specialize in linguistics, literature, history and anthropology, or philosophy and religion, though they are expected to go beyond conventional disciplinary boundaries and cultivate knowledge and expertise in interdisciplinary dialogue and interaction. A candidate for an MPhil degree is expected to demonstrate knowledge in the discipline and to synthesize and create new knowledge, making a contribution to the field.


The Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) Program is interdisciplinary in nature. It provides training for students who intend to pursue professional and academic careers. Students may specialize in linguistics, literature, history and anthropology, or philosophy and religion, but are expected to go beyond conventional disciplinary boundaries and cultivate knowledge and expertise in interdisciplinary dialogue and interaction. A candidate for a PhD degree is expected to demonstrate mastery of knowledge in the chosen discipline and to synthesize and create new knowledge, making an original and substantial contribution to the discipline

The programs are offer by the Division of Humanities, with the following research foci.
 

Research Foci

Research foci include: Chinese economic and social history, comparative history of environment and technology, European intellectual and cultural history, and history of Sino-foreign relations, Chinese linguistics and history of Chinese language and dialects, Chinese philosophy (Confucianism, Taoism and Buddhism), political and moral philosophy, comparative philosophy of East and West, Chinese literature, comparative literature, animation and film studies, and cultural studies, and cultural anthropology on rural and urban South China.

To qualify for admission, applicants must meet all of the following requirements. Admission is selective and meeting these minimum requirements does not guarantee admission.

 

1. General Admission Requirements of the University
  • Applicants seeking admission to a master's degree program should have obtained a bachelor’s degree from a recognized institution, or an approved equivalent qualification;

  • Applicants seeking admission to a doctoral degree program should have obtained a bachelor’s degree with a proven record of outstanding performance from a recognized institution; or presented evidence of satisfactory work at the postgraduate level on a full-time basis for at least one year, or on a part-time basis for at least two years.

2. English Language Admission Requirements

Applicants have to fulfill English Language requirements with one of the following proficiency attainments:
 

Proficiency Test Minimum Scores
TOEFL-iBT 80
TOEFL-pBT 550
IELTS (Academic Module) Overall score: 6.0 and All sub-scores: 5.5


Applicants don't need to present TOEFL or IELTS score if

  • their first language is English, or

  • they obtained the bachelor's degree (or equivalent) from an institution where the medium of instruction was English.

  1. Minimum Credit Requirement

MPhil: 12 credits 
PhD: 21 credits 
 

  1. Credit Transfer

Subject to the approval of the Division's PG Committee, PhD students may be granted credit tansfer up to 9 credits on a case-by-case basis. 
 

  1. Required Courses

MPhil:

A minimum of 12 credits of postgraduate courses in the Division of Humanities, preferably in their first year of study. The second year is normally devoted to the writing of the MPhil thesis.


PhD:

A minimum of 21 credits of postgraduate courses in the Division of Humanities, including HUMA 6200.
 

HUMA 6200

 

All new students must propose a course-taking plan for the first academic year in consultation with their advisors. The proposal, consisting of a list of couses to be taken in the first year and a study plan specifying the learning objectives and how these objectives can be achieved by the proposed list of courses, should be submitted to the Division's PG Committee for endorsement with prior approval of the advisor, no later than the end of the course add/drop period of the first regular term.
 

  1. Professional Developement Course Requirement
PDEV 6770

 

Students are required to complete PDEV 6770. The 1 credit earned from PDEV 6770 cannot be counted towards the credit requirement.
 

PhD students who are HKUST MPhil graduates and have completed PDEV 6770 or other professional development courses offered by the university before may be exempted from this requirement, subject to prior approval of the School.
 

  1. English Language Requirement
LANG 5071

 

Students are required to complete LANG 5071. The 1 credit earned from LANG 5071 cannot be counted toward the credit requirements. Students can be exempted from taking LANG 5071 with the agreement of the Division Head and PG Committee. PhD students can also be exempted if they have completed this course in the MPhil Program in Humanities before.
 

  1. PhD Third Language Requirement

For PhD students, the study of a foreign language may be an important part of their preparation for research and teaching. A third language (normally Japanese, French or German), other than English and Chinese, is optional, but according to specific needs of the thesis research, the supervisor has the authority to require a student to take one and decide what level of proficiency should be achieved before graduation. The level of competence in a third language can be demonstrated either through satisfactory completion of a second-year language course taken within the last five years or through acceptable performance in a standardized examination. The third language, if required, must be fulfilled no later than the term in which the student completes the qualifying examination.
 

  1. Postgraduate Seminar
HUMA 6300

 

PhD students are requried to complete and pass HUMA 6300. the 1 credit earned from HUMA 6300 cannot be counted toward the credit requirements.
 

  1.  PhD Qualifying Examination

To become a doctoral candidate, a PhD student must pass a written qualifying examination. The qualifying examination should be completed no later than the third regular term of study for full-time students, or the fifth regular term for part-time students. For details of the qualifying examination, please refer to the Division’s website.

 

  1. Thesis Research
HUMA 6990
HUMA 7990

 

MPhil:

  1. Registration in HUMA 6990; and
  2. Presentation and oral defense of the MPhil thesis.

PhD:

  1. Registration in HUMA 7990; and
  2. Presentation and oral defense of the PhD thesis.
     

The thesis must be based on original research. It should demonstrate an awareness of the conceptual and methodological problems related to the chosen topic and a solid command of bibliographical materials in the field of study. The format of the thesis should conform to the guidelines outlined in the Handbook for Research Postgraduate Studies and also to the requirements listed in the Division’s website.

The thesis is normally written in English. If a student wishes to use Chinese as the thesis language, prior approval must be obtained. For details, please refer to the Division’s website.


A student submitting a thesis will need to defend it before the Thesis Examination Committee. For details of thesis examinations, please refer to the Handbook for Research Postgraduate Studies and the Division’s website.

 

Last Update: 10 July 2017

MPhil:

Students may opt for one of the four areas of concentration. To opt for an area of concentration, at least 6 credits of postgraduate coursework must be taken from the chosen concentration.
 

PhD:

Students are required to focus their research on one of the four areas of concentration. For all areas of concentration, at least 9 credits of the required coursework must be taken in the student’s chosen concentration.
 

Before the commencement of each academic year, the Division will provide students with a list of courses to be offered in each area of concentration.

 

  1. Linguistics Concentration

Students will focus their research on Chinese linguistics, inclusing phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, and dialectology, or Sino-Tibetan linguistics from a historical perspective.
 

  1. Literature Concentration

Students will focus primarily on Chinese literature from comparative, interdisciplinary, and theoretical perspectives.
 

  1. History and Anthropology Concentration

Students will have the option of choosing one of the following two areas:
 

Area A – Chinese History and World History
This area focuses on the history of China with emphasis on the period from early China to the People’s Republic, whereas World History focuses on European and/or American history. Approaches to the subject can be economic, social, political, cultural, intellectual, or comparative.
 

Area B – Cultural Anthropology and Social History
This area focuses primarily on South China. Research areas include not only Guangdong and Fujian, but also regions extending from Taiwan through Hong Kong and Macao to Hainan. Other possible subjects of study are overseas Chinese (in Southeast Asia, Japan, North America, and Europe) and the ethnic groups of southern and southwestern China (She, Yao, Dan, etc.).
 

  1. Philosophy and Religion Concentration

Students will focus their research on at least one  of the following areas: Chinese, Asian, Western, and comparitive philosophy and/or religion. 

 

Last Update: 10 July 2017